Summer exhibitions / by Jess Booth

The Koorie Art Show 2018, Koorie Heritage Trust, Melbourne

8 December 2018 – 24 February 2019

Kelly Koumalatsos (Wergaia/Wemba Wemba),  Benim wile. To cover over with possum blanket. Wergaia.  print making ink on paper with linen thread. Winner of the Metro Tunnel Creative Program 2D Award. Image courtesy Art Almanac.

Kelly Koumalatsos (Wergaia/Wemba Wemba), Benim wile. To cover over with possum blanket. Wergaia. print making ink on paper with linen thread. Winner of the Metro Tunnel Creative Program 2D Award. Image courtesy Art Almanac.

Annual award and survey exhibition of Victoria-based Indigenous artists. An incredibly diverse and impressive show. We’re big fans of Kelly Koumalatsos’ stunning work incorporating possum fur and printmaking, as seen in the image above.

One not to be missed if you’re baking in hot dry Melbourne over the summer break!

 

Nonggirrna Marawili, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney

3 November 2018 – 24 February 2019

Nonggirrna Marawili,  Yathikpa  2013, natural pigments on bark, 138.5 x 91cm (irreg.), Collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales. Image courtesy AGNSW.

Nonggirrna Marawili, Yathikpa 2013, natural pigments on bark, 138.5 x 91cm (irreg.), Collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales. Image courtesy AGNSW.

Retrospective of the phenomenal work of Nonggirrna Marawili. Based in Yirrkala, North East Arnhem Land, Marawili is “inspired by the atmospheric effects that are created as country is brought to life through the movement of wind, water or unseen forces”. Marawili began her career as a printmaker, but in recent years has further refined her skills in painting to become one of the most distinctive Aboriginal artists working today.

  

In These Hands (Mara Nyangangka) Celebrating 70 years of Ernabella Arts, Jam Factory, Seppeltsfield, Adelaide

30 November 2018 – 11 February 2019

Elizabeth Dunn, artist working with Ernabella Arts. Image courtesy Art Guide Australia and Ernabella Arts.

Elizabeth Dunn, artist working with Ernabella Arts. Image courtesy Art Guide Australia and Ernabella Arts.

An exhibition about Australia’s two oldest centres for craft and design – Sturt Gallery and Studios (since 1941) and Ernabella Arts (since 1948). In the late 1960s Elisabeth Nagel, master weaver from Sturt in the lush green Southern Highlands of NSW, travelled to the remote Pukatja Community in far north western South Australia where she met Winifred Hilliard, the then-manager of the craft industry at Ernabella Mission. Together they sparked a ground-breaking residency initiative. The exhibition tells the story of that residency and offers a showcase of the contemporary work in painting, ceramics and tjanpi (native grass) weaving and punu (timber) work.

 

Too-roo-dun, Maroondah Federation Estate Gallery, Victoria

14 January – 29 March 2019

One of the larger than life too-roo-dun sculptures created fir the Too-roo-dun project. Image courtesy Baluk Arts.

One of the larger than life too-roo-dun sculptures created fir the Too-roo-dun project. Image courtesy Baluk Arts.

 Too-roo-dun is a Boonwurrung word for bunyip, which is a word from the Wathawurrung language of the Kulin Nation of Central Victoria. For the Too-roo-dun project life-sized bunyips were created by seven Aboriginal organisations including Winja Ulupna, Healesville Indigenous Community Services Association, Bunjilwarra, Mullum Mullum Aboriginal Cooperative, Willum Warrain, Casey Elders Yarn & Art Group and Baluk Arts. They are incredible!